MPs on reform

The map below is updated regularly. However, to view the very latest list of MPs' views on PR as a google sheet, click here.

Frequently asked questions

The data used on the map comes primarily from correspondence between constituents and their elected MPs. We’ve also included MPs who voted in Parliament in favour of adopting Proportional Representation (ten minute rule motion, December 2015, by Jonathan Reynolds MP), and MPs who have made clear their position in public speeches or articles. If your MP is not listed, get in touch with them and share a copy of their response with us. If they are already on the map, it’s still important to write to them to let them know you are not satisfied with our present electoral system.

The data used on the map comes primarily from correspondence between constituents and their elected MPs. We’ve also included MPs who voted in Parliament in favour of adopting Proportional Representation (ten minute rule motion, December 2015, by Jonathan Reynolds MP), and MPs who have made clear their position in public speeches or articles. If your MP is not listed, get in touch with them and share a copy of their response with us. If they are already on the map, it’s still important to write to them to let them know you are not satisfied with our present electoral system.

Most of the MPs' quotes are taken from their replies to letters sent by constituents. In many cases MPs - particularly MPs opposing PR - replied using wholly or partly identical text, presumably provided by a central office.  For example,  here are the standard templates many Conservatives used to respond to their constituents . To an extent, this undermines the argument that First Past the Post provides a strong, personal constituency link between an MP and the people whose concerns they are supposed to represent. By contrast, a multi-member system of proportional representation would mean that most people had a representative in their local area who shares their views and concerns - making it far more likely that a constituent could contact a representative who will properly consider any issue they wish to raise.

Most of the MPs' quotes are taken from their replies to letters sent by constituents. In many cases MPs - particularly MPs opposing PR - replied using wholly or partly identical text, presumably provided by a central office.

For example, here are the standard templates many Conservatives used to respond to their constituents. To an extent, this undermines the argument that First Past the Post provides a strong, personal constituency link between an MP and the people whose concerns they are supposed to represent. By contrast, a multi-member system of proportional representation would mean that most people had a representative in their local area who shares their views and concerns - making it far more likely that a constituent could contact a representative who will properly consider any issue they wish to raise.


Many MPs who are opposed to PR claim that it would inevitably damage the link between them and their constituents, whose interests they represent. In reality, there are a number of systems of PR that keep or even improve this link. The Additional Member System (AMS) maintains the current principle of one-MP-to-one-constituency, while using top-up lists to ensure that the share of seats a party wins matches the share of the vote the people give them. For more examples see our  voting systems page .

Many MPs who are opposed to PR claim that it would inevitably damage the link between them and their constituents, whose interests they represent. In reality, there are a number of systems of PR that keep or even improve this link. The Additional Member System (AMS) maintains the current principle of one-MP-to-one-constituency, while using top-up lists to ensure that the share of seats a party wins matches the share of the vote the people give them. For more examples see our voting systems page.

No. It’s a common myth but the fact is the UK has never had a referendum on whether to change to a proportional voting system. The system put forward in the 2011 referendum was the Alternative Vote. This is not a proportional system, and shares the problems caused by disproportionality which afflict First Past the Post. David Cameron once said: “I'm here today to explain as clearly as I can why AV is completely the wrong reform…let me take on this myth that AV is more fair and more proportional than the system we have currently”.

No. It’s a common myth but the fact is the UK has never had a referendum on whether to change to a proportional voting system. The system put forward in the 2011 referendum was the Alternative Vote. This is not a proportional system, and shares the problems caused by disproportionality which afflict First Past the Post. David Cameron once said: “I'm here today to explain as clearly as I can why AV is completely the wrong reform…let me take on this myth that AV is more fair and more proportional than the system we have currently”.